On Air Now

Pete Egerton

10:00am - 2:00pm

Now Playing

Ed Sheeran

Shivers

Himalayan Garden gets to work replacing storm damaged trees

Himalayan Garden & Sculpture Park are replacing trees and shrubs that have been damaged by storms and disease in recent years.

Himalayan Garden gets to work replacing storm damaged trees Himalayan Garden & Sculpture Park are replacing trees and shrubs that have been damaged by storms and disease in recent years.

It's all part of National Tree Planting Week, which runs from 27th November - 5th December.

In 2021 the Forestry Commission identified large swathes of larch trees which were diseased with Phytophthora Ramorum.

Two hundred trees were felled from inside the garden and a large larch woodland on the edge of the park also needed felling.

Unusual summer heat causes tree wilt and resulted in the loss of a prized 100-year Hungarian Oak Tree set in the heart of the garden, and the increase in winter storms has also taken its toll, with significant loses in February 2022 and again this month with Storm Debi.

[caption id="attachment_90072" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] The team are planting more Hydrangeas and a variety of trees and shrubs around the garden.[/caption]

All this leaves the garden team with the challenge of dealing with the immediate visual impact to the garden and surrounding landscape and how to plant for a future changing climate.

Head Gardener, Joel Dibb said:

“There is a lot to be said about trees and the ongoing impact on them from diseases and the stresses of our changing climate, and it is something we and other gardens and parks open to the public need to be very vigilant about and find creative ways to mitigate against it.

"For us this has been planting different trees and shrubs in different places and starting to develop a new tree canopy for the future, which as it matures will provide shelter for the other plants around them.”

Read more local stories from Your Harrogate here.

More from Local News