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Harrogate sixth formers sign up to donate stem cells in support of student with leukaemia

Sixth Form students at St. Aidan’s and St John Fisher Associated Sixth Form are supporting Harry Brown, who is fighting acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

Harrogate sixth formers sign up to donate stem cells in support of student with leukaemia A group of Harrogate sixth formers are showing support for a friend diagnosed with leukaemia by signing up to donate stem cells. Students at St. Aidan’s and St John Fisher Associated Sixth Form are supporting fellow student Harry Brown, who is currently fighting acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. By registering to donate stem cells if needed, their aim is to help others in a similar position to Harry. Harry, who is in Year 13, is undergoing treatment for the disease and is dependent on life-saving platelet and blood donations. But he will ultimately need a stem cell transplant to achieve a cure for his condition and is dependent on finding a suitable donor. [caption id="attachment_103109" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Pupils at St. Aidan’s and St John Fisher Associated Sixth Form signed up to donate stem cells.[/caption] Charity group The Hero Project work closely with the Antony Nolan Trust to educate appropriate audiences about Stem Cell donations and then host recruitment events where swabs can be taken from volunteers between the ages of 16-30. In the Sixth Form Café at St. Aidan’s Church of England High School yesterday (Thursday), just under one hundred students gathered to sign up to be put on the register. This included Year 12 student Arthur Harrison, who said:

“It’s the easiest way to save a life!”
Sam Walker-Taylor, Year 12 registered too. He said:
“It was just a good opportunity to make a difference”.
Anthony Nolan uses its register of over 900,000 people to match stem cell donors to blood cancer and blood disorder patients in desperate need of a transplant. If a patient has a condition that affects their bone marrow or blood, then a stem cell transplant may be their best chance of survival. Doctors will give new, healthy stem cells to the patient via their bloodstream, where they begin to grow and create healthy red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Kim Orton, who is Deputy Director of Sixth Form at St. Aidan’s, said:
“How amazingly proud I am of Sixth Form students from across the Association, who have willingly put themselves forward to support their classmate Harry and others in need of stem cell transplants. "A huge thanks to Anthony Nolan and the Hero Project for coming in.”
To find out more about giving blood, visit the NHS Give Blood website, and for more information about how to donate stem cells, go to the Anthony Nolan websiteRead more local stories from Your Harrogate here.

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