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Harrogate pupils perform health and wellbeing concert for elderly

Ashville College pupils have turned to their musical skills to improve the health and wellbeing of both elderly people and those living in crisis.

Harrogate pupils perform health and wellbeing concert for elderly Pupils from a Harrogate school have turned to their musical skills to improve the health and wellbeing of both elderly people and those living in crisis. Ashville College encourages all its pupils to participate in outreach work across the community – with its young musicians being the latest to take centre stage in enriching people’s lives in different ways. Singers from the school joined its assembly band to perform at St Andrew’s Church in Starbeck to mark the 20th anniversary of Christian charity Wellspring. Founded in 2003 and supported by the Bishop of Leeds, the Rt Rev Nick Baines, it provides affordable psychological support for people in crisis of all ages and backgrounds. Ashville pupils gave up part of the Sunday to sing and play at the celebratory service, even though many had a busy week preparing and performing at Harrogate’s Royal Hall in the annual inter-house competition. Another group from the school also walked to the Adelphi Care Home on Harrogate’s Cold Bath Road to sing and play for residents, as well as to chat and reminisce over a cup of tea. Ashville College’s Deputy Head (Co-Curricular and Outreach), Anna Wilby, said:

“We are lucky to have so many talented musicians and it is really rewarding for them to perform outside school and use their skills to boost people’s health and wellbeing. “We know music has the power to inspire, reassure or motivate each of us as individuals. As part of the community, we at Ashville always welcome the opportunity to share our talents and enhance the lives of others where we can. “Our musicians have been excellent ambassadors for the school at both events, and we know that their performances also have the potential to have a lasting impact on the wellbeing of members of the audience.”
Singing for health is increasingly popular for a range of long-term health challenges. This often includes people for whom medical treatment options are limited, for example dementia, chronic respiratory illness, Parkinson’s, and those suffering from mental illness. Miss Wilby added:
“Considerable research has been completed into how listening to music can drive athletes to perform at their best, relax individuals facing stress and anxiety, lift depression, combat insomnia and even ease pain. “Shakespeare describes it as the food of love while Plato spoke of music being something that leads to all that is good, just and beautiful. “If our singers and musicians can bring a little of that into the lives of members of our community who may be facing personal challenges or who just need a bit of a lift, then we’ll always be willing to step forward.”
Read more local stories from Your Harrogate here.

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